VISN 4 MIRECC Pittsburgh Investigators and Mentors - Daniel J. Buysse, M.D. - MIRECC / CoE
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VISN 4 MIRECC Pittsburgh Investigators and Mentors - Daniel J. Buysse, M.D.

Daniel J. Buysse, M.D.
Email: buyssedj@upmc.edu
MIRECC Role(s): Fellowship Co-Mentor
Bio: Dr. Buysse is Professor of Psychiatry and Clinical and Translational Science, as well as Director of the Neuroscience Clinical and Translational Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Michigan, and completed his residency and fellowship training at the University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on the diagnosis, assessment, pathophysiology, and treatment of insomnia. Dr. Buysse has received research funding from the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Aging, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the National Center on Research Resources. He has served on several initial review groups and advisory committees at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Buysse has published over 200 articles in peer-reviewed journals and 82 book chapters or review articles. Dr. Buysse is Past President of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and is Associate Editor of the journals SLEEP, Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, and Behavioral Sleep Medicine.
Research Interests: Dr. Buysse's research interests focus on insomnia, sleep in aging, and sleep in psychiatric disorders, particularly sleep in depression. This work includes the assessment, diagnostic reliability, and pharmacologic treatment of insomnia; circadian aspects of age-related sleep changes; and sleep correlates of treatment outcome in depression.